professional book editing services

Book Editing, Proofreading, Book Design,

Indexing, and Manuscript Submission Services

Frequently Asked Questions About Book Editing Associates

Who are the editors in this network?

The network is made up of well-qualified editors, proofreaders, and writers in a variety of genres and specialties. No matter what level of editing, mentoring, or writing you need, at least one of them is a likely match for your project.

How are editors screened to make sure they qualify for this network?

The editors had to pass a series of tests and demonstrate excellent credentials (depending on their specialties). They also had to agree to adhere to a list of ethical guidelines (e.g., fair pricing, using an editing agreement). Client feedback is also monitored.

Please note that not all editors provide every level of editing or submission services. For example, if "proofreading" is listed in the editor's bio, the editor is one of the 2% of applicants who passed the proofreading tests. If you do not see "copyediting" listed with the bio, it means that the editor focuses on content development.

How are the editors related to this network?

This is a screening service that was formed to protect writers from online scams and from self-appointed editors and proofreaders who offer substandard services. The editors and publishing consultants posted on this site are freelance; therefore, your service agreement is with the editor/consultant you select, not with the network as a whole or the network coordinator.

What are your submission procedures?

Follow the instructions on our Request an Editing Quote page. Remember, you'll need to include a sample along with your submission if you want a quote for any level of editing or consulting.

Can I get the contact information (e-mail address or phone number) for a particular editor listed on the site?

Not immediately. You must first go through the submission procedure and name the editor(s) in whom you are interested. Your e-mail will be forwarded to the editors and direct contact can then begin.

Can I speak with the network coordinator about pricing and turnaround time before I submit?

The network coordinator cannot give price quotes and time estimates over the phone or via the chat button. This is a network of freelance editors with varying prices and work schedules. To obtain a price quote please follow the procedures listed on our Request an Editing Quote page.

*** If you've gone through the submission process and have not received responses, notify the coordinator call 1-855-EDITING (553-3484) Monday - Friday, 10a-7p central.  The coordinator is not able to provide price quotes or turnaround times for the freelance editors in this network but can confirm if your submission was received and expedite responses.

Do not call before going through the submission process (see above). ***

Will the editors accept all submissions?

No. It would be unethical for editors in this network to accept material they don't feel can be improved with their editorial input. If the editors reject your submission (and if you agree with their assessments) you may request rewriting or mentoring services, which are additional services available through this network.

What happens if I ask for light editing and the editors believe my work needs more intensive editing?

No two editors will share exactly the same opinion, but if you receive a general consensus that a different level of editing (or a rewrite) is needed, you can choose to accept their opinions or ignore them. The editors in this network will not be dishonest with you in order to charge a higher rate.

Is my submission confidential?

The network coordinator does not keep the writing samples after sending the submission to the editor(s) you selected. If you did not name an editor, your submission is forwarded to several editors who might be a good match. Your submission is never posted, shared outside the network, or distributed electronically or in print. If you decide to use one of our editors, your submission will be deleted when you inform the responding editors that you have chosen to work with someone else.

How long does it take to receive a response?

The network coordinator receives e-mails between 9 am and 7 pm weekdays (Central Time), and sporadically on weekends. In all cases, you should receive a response no later than the next business day. Our goal is no more than 3 hours.

I sent a sample chapter. Why didn't any of my selected editors accept my submission?

1. A topic/style mismatch. Our editors will turn down a submission if they feel another editor in the network is a better match.
2. An unrealistic deadline or budget.
3. You may have asked for price-matching with another editor in this network or on another website.

You can ask the network coordinator for assistance if your selected editors do not accept your submission.

If I send a chapter, will I get a sample edit?

Only if the editor(s) intends to consider your manuscript. However, if you do not receive a response of any kind from at least one editor within one business day, contact the network coordinator.

Your sample edit will not consist of the entire chapter you sent. Because of the time commitment involved, a sample edit is usually 1 to 3 pages, depending on how much material the editor feels is necessary to edit in order to demonstrate the level of editing required and the editor's particular style. The sample edit also gives the editor an idea of how much time your project will require and how much to quote.

Does my editor need to be an expert in my topic or genre?

Not always. A good copy editor knows when to look up a word or query an author when something doesn't look right. Copy editors are not walking dictionaries, but they are suspicious of every word they read. That's why editors catch mistakes that your friends and colleagues didn't when they read your material and pronounced it "perfect." With developmental editing, it might be more helpful to work with a specialist in your topic or genre, especially if you need help with improving the story (fiction writing) or presenting your research (nonfiction).

Will the editor I select start work on my material right away?

Professional editors with long track records and outstanding reputations will have steady workloads, and many are booked weeks in advance. At times, however, a client may reschedule and leave a vacant spot on an editor's calendar. Ask your editor about his/her next available date.

I'm eager to begin submitting my manuscript to agents right away. How soon can I expect my manuscript edit to be complete?

It is important that you are realistic about the editing process. Editing is a slow, meticulous process that cannot be rushed (e.g., a 100,000-word manuscript may require 4+ weeks for an intensive development edit). Even if you only require proofreading, a job of that size usually takes 2+ weeks to complete because of the multiple readings required. (The frequent typographical errors in newspapers and other daily/weekly publications show what speed does to quality.) Also, the editors in this network are usually working on a current project with a contractual deadline date and cannot put your manuscript ahead of work they already started.

Do the editors use an editing agreement / contract?

All editors in this network must use an agreement that spells out the scope of the project, the cost, and the schedule.

How do I get on an editor's calendar?

The editors set appointments on a first-come, first-served basis. You must return the editing agreement and pay a deposit to your editor to secure your spot.

What is the turnaround time once the editor starts on my project?

Each editor has a different schedule, and much depends on the level of editorial input needed. Obviously, a manuscript that needs a heavy edit will take longer to complete.

How much will it cost?

The editors must see a sample and perform a short sample edit to give you a price quote. The rate for your project depends on the level of editing required, the complexity of the material, and the estimated turnaround time. When possible, they will give you a per-word rate because many factors can affect the number of words on a page (e.g., spacing and margins). The range for proofreading/copyediting/developmental editing is 1 to 8 cents per word. Rewriting is 8-20 cents per word. Expect a higher rate quote for technical/medical documents.

Is word count the number of total words or just the words edited?

Word count is the number of words your editor will read/edit/rewrite. If there are portions you don't want edited, remove those portions from the file that you send the editor. Should you hire an editor, the word count submitted for the estimate will be compared with the word count of the document received for editing. A higher/lower word count means higher/lower cost.

I received responses from two editors who gave me two different per-word prices. I like the work of the editor who quoted a higher rate, but I want the lower price offered by the other editor. Will my preferred editor match the price of another editor in the network?

The editors in our network work independently and are not in competition with each other. The editor you prefer may see a need for heavier editorial input, and the additional time involved would justify the higher quote. Each freelancer sets his/her own rate. As with any service, you can ask the editors about the basis for their quotes; however, no editor is required to lower their quoted fee to match another editor's quote. Remember: It is in your best interest to select the editor who most closely matches your expectations.

Why is there a difference in the quotes I've received from other networks and the quotes received from this network?

The saying "you get what you pay for" often applies to the field of editing. It is common for novices who want to break into editing and gain experience—or those who cannot pass editing and proofreading screening tests—to charge lower rates. Many applicants who fail our editing tests often end up in networks with lower standards, or they put up their own websites and offer services they are not qualified to provide. The editors in this network possess excellent credentials, have passed a series of tests, and have agreed to the ethical guidelines that are part of this network.

Do the editors work chapter by chapter?

Some, yes. Put that request into your submission.

What are my payment options?

Your editor will inform you of the payment options.

What if I decide to end the relationship with my editor?

The editing agreement you signed stipulates the steps required to end the writer-editor relationship.

Will an editor work on my book in exchange for a percent of profits?

No. The term for that is "on spec" (speculation). It is basically asking the editor to work for free. There's no guarantee that a book will see a profit (or even be published).

Is the deposit refundable if I change my mind?

No. The deposit causes your editor to turn down other work offers. If you do cancel, you likely cause your editor to suffer a financial loss. Most of the service agreements allow you to reschedule your project without losing your deposit if you give the editor adequate notice (2+ weeks).

Can I ask the editor for references?

Absolutely. In fact, feedback is posted on our site.

What's the difference between a critique, developmental/substantive editing and copyediting?

Copy editors work with the writer to make sure that the material is clear, easy to read, and error-free. Copy editors tend to start from the small picture (i.e., analyzing words, sentences, and paragraphs) and work up to the big picture.

Developmental/substantive editors go about things in the opposite order. They begin by reading the manuscript for the big picture (e.g., plot and character development). Most manuscripts that receive developmental editing are in need of major revision, so there's no point in copyediting huge chunks of the manuscript that will be either deleted or altered.

A critique editor provides a written report to the author that points out strengths and weaknesses and offers revision suggestions. A critique is not an edit; unless the writer has a separate mentoring arrangement with the editor, the writer must figure out how to implement the suggestions. Some critique editors are also developmental editors who will work with the author to restructure and/or rewrite parts or all of the manuscript.

Are there book designers in the network?

Yes, we have specialists who design books for children and adults.

Can I get help with self-publishing?

Yes. We're big proponents of self-publishing (or "indie publishing," as it is now being called), and we've worked with many self-published authors who hold themselves and their work to a high standard.

Going the self-publishing route means you won't have in-house editors trying to change your manuscript to suit the publisher's tastes or the company's bottom line, and you won't need to write a book proposal, synopsis, or other documents in an effort to get representation. Instead, working with your independent editor, you can frame the manuscript exactly as you see fit. In addition, we also have book designers and typesetters who can help you create the exact look and feel you envision. 

What do I get back?

Most of the editors use Word's tracking feature, which shows all edits, embedded comments, and queries. In those cases, you will likely get back a tracked file and a "clean" file (with no tracking and all edits accepted). Since the final product is the writer's, you may accept or override any/some/all of the marked edits.

What are some steps a writer can take to choose an editor?

An excellent article appeared on Ciao.co.uk (a consumer review site) under the category of "Literary Editors." This has been posted on the network's site without alteration (and with the writer's permission). Read the article here.

What other information do you need to know?

  • Do you have a publisher or agent in mind for your project?
  • Do you plan to self-publish or seek traditional publication?
  • Do you have previous writing experience? Have you studied writing or taken part in critique groups?
  • What help do you think you need with your project?

What do editors expect from the writers they work with?

  • Be open to suggestions. The final product is yours, but don't waste your money on editing if you're too attached to your draft and will override all edits.
  • Stay available. Let your editor know how to reach you by providing several means of contact.
  • Let your editor work. Don't call or e-mail each day to check on progress.
  • Send your work to your editor at the agreed-upon time. If you know you won't be ready by your appointment date, let your editor know well ahead of the start date (at least 14 days before your appointment date) so your editor can reschedule you and possibly acquire other work. You may lose your deposit if you cancel without adequate notice.
  • Remember that this is a professional arrangement. Pay the correct amounts on the dates specified in the editing agreement. Don't delay payment dates or alter payment amounts.

Do editors have a policy regarding use of their name in the acknowledgments / preface?

Most editors will allow use of their name if the writer has accepted all of the edits and has not added new material that the editor has not seen (which may have errors or other problems that would reflect badly on the editor's professional reputation).

Will editors work with writers who have self-publishing in mind?

Yes.

Can my editor help me submit my manuscript to agents or publishers?

Many of our editors offer submission services to their clients. They will help craft the query letter and book synopsis. It's a misconception, however, that editors have their collective feet in the doors of literary agents. Editor/agent "collaboration" is an ethical gray area.

Should I get an agent?

Yes. Most large publishing houses will not accept manuscripts from unrepresented authors. Just because you have an agent, however, does not mean your book will get published. If you are unable to secure an agent, you may still be able to get your book published at a smaller publishing house. Check each publisher's submissions guidelines carefully to make sure they accept manuscripts from unagented authors, and then follow the publisher's submission guidelines to the letter.

From a legal viewpoint, unless an author is an expert on legal matters pertaining to contracts and has the time and ability to research which publishers are most likely to accept the manuscript and offer the best financial terms, the author is better off working with an agent. It can be as difficult to attract the attention of an agent as it is to get a contract from a publisher, but in the end the contract is likely to be under better terms for the author, and the author will have saved considerable legwork and time.

Can you guarantee that my edited manuscript will be accepted by an agent or publisher?

Though your editor(s) will assist you in making the manuscript presentable and as error-free as humanly possible, representation or publication cannot be guaranteed. (No editor in this network or any other can, or should, make such a promise.)

I had a great/bad experience with the editor I selected. Should I tell the network coordinator?

Absolutely (in either case). Any editor who has several legitimate negative feedback reports will be removed from the network.

Note: An editor refusing to work without prepayment or to do free additional work (above and beyond the scope outlined in the agreement) are not legitimate complaints; an editor missing a contractual deadline or becoming unavailable is.

Because of the ethical guidelines of this network and the collection of feedback from network clients, legitimate complaints have rarely occurred since the network was formed in 1998.

Please let the network coordinator know about your experience with your editor(s).

 

Copyright 1998 - Present
Lynda Lotman

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